Rhédey Castle, Seuca

  • Historical Monuments Code:
  • MS-II-a-A-15678
  • Address:
  • Seuca
  • Dated to:
  • 19th century
  • Ownership:
  • state property

The building, situated in a large parc, was built probably in the 18th century, the Baroque architectural elements indicate this period. It is uncertain, who the buyer was, what we know for sure is that the estate belonged in the 19th century to the Rhédey family and has become property of the Wesselényi family after the marriage of Stefánia Rhédey with István Wesselényi.

The aristocratic constructions of Seuca were less researched until now, that is why we do not have precise information about the history of the castle. On the List of historical monuments maintained by the Ministry of Culture, Religious Affairs and National Heritage, the building is to be found under the name of the Castle of Rhédey-Rothenthal and according to the research of Hilda Horváth the castle belonged in the first half of the 20th century to Margit Wesselényi, wife of Henrik Rothental. Even though, the media is referring to the building as the Castle of Petrichevich-Horváth. The building, situated in a large parc, was built probably in the 18th century, the Baroque architectural elements indicate this period. It is uncertain, who the buyer was, what we know for sure is that the estate belonged in the 19th century to the Rhédey family and has become property of the Wesselényi family after the marriage of Stefánia Rhédey with István Wesselényi. The couple had two children: Sarolta, later wife of count Ödön Bethlen from 1882 and Margit, who married baron Henrik Rothental in 1891. The latter couple was the owner of the estate of Seuca at the turn of the century and they probably administered a large-scale renovation of the building, the date of 1898 on the weathervane indicates this. They had no children, so the estate became after 1918 the property of countess Sarolta Wesselényi, wife of Ödön Bethlen (1860–1928) and then their daughter's, countess Stefánia Bethlen (1885–1975), who became wife of Artúr Petrichevich-Horváth in 1911.

Due to the soil conditions the main building has a two-story structure, while the opposite side of the building is single-storied. To the rectangular-planned main building with a mansard roof there are connecting several buildings with different plans. The saloon on the main facade was extended with a two-storey building, with three arches on the ground floor, three throughout rounded windows on the first floor transformed later into straight-headed windows, on the opposite side it was built a pilastered portico with a Baroque gable. In its glory days the building was decorated with ornate steps, the ceiling was coved with fancy molding and its chambers decorated with porcelain stoves. The two-storey guesthouse in a cruciform structure may remind us also of the Castle of Urmeniş. Its ground floor had kitchens and agricultural buildings, the floor had the guest rooms with a covered porch with an arch. After the nationalization the castle became the property of the National Council, then went into cooperative and then it became  National Agricultural Company's property.

After the regime change the building became the property of an agricultural association, which went into liquidation, so it became later the property of the Agency of State Domains. Although Artúr Petrichevich-Horváth, descendant of the family is still alive, does not intend to regain the building.

 

How do you get here?

How do you get here?



Links